Tag Archives: food

How to Get Kids Interested in Nutrition

Is it time for your children to learn how to make their own healthy food choices? Exploring the world of nutrition can be exciting. As soon as kids can start opening the fridge to pull out an afternoon snack, the importance of nutritional education becomes even more apparent. Are you ready to have fun teaching your children how to make smart food choices? This guide will help you get started.

English: Healthy nutrition pyramid with 7 to 9...

English: Healthy nutrition pyramid with 7 to 9 servings of fruits and vegetables to get precious phytonutrients to feed your body at the cellular level. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It’s All About the Motivation

Kids love to ask “why”. It’s the go-to response whether you’re asserting a rule or just walking through the park. This curiosity is what makes early education so effective. Your child will actually want to make healthy food choices after learning about the benefits.

Sometimes choices are the greatest motivator. Does your child have any favorite fruits or vegetables? He may not even know his favorite foods are healthy. Offer a variety, and let him choose. Ask why he made the choice and then explain why it’s a good, healthy choice. Make it a habit of asking, “Why did you choose this?” Most kids don’t think about why they chose a certain snack but the questioning exercise will help him remember to think about it more carefully.

The doctor’s office is also a great place to learn – pediatricians are great at explaining why good food leads to a strong body and brain, and why bad food leads to health complications. Let your child ask some of those pressing questions she may have, like what would happen if she ate only one food for a year. Don’t be afraid to be a little bit silly.

Young people prefer to follow advice they can understand. It’s hard to stick with a healthy diet if you don’t know the effects of a bad one.

Rewarding Ways to Teach Nutrition

Teaching nutrition is much easier when fun is involved. Visiting farms and snack food factories are a great way to show the distinction between the two types of food – the junk food factory may be huge and exciting, but even kids can see that the magic of the farm is all about life and vitality, and healthy living.

Cooking is also a great way to learn. Try these activities and take time to explain the health benefits: bake a meal instead of frying, cook with healthy ingredients, and opt for fresh foods instead of canned when possible. Try making a healthy dessert to remove the misconception that only junk food tastes good. Make a smorgasbord representing the suggested food pyramid portions. Kids need to know what makes a meal healthy compared to unhealthy meals.

We hope that your child can get just as excited about nutrition as you are. You have already taken an active interest, which means you’re already off to the best start possible.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7331527

By Nelly Bee

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Feeding Kids The Right Way

Many people’s feelings about food were instilled as children.

We learn good and bad food habits from our parents and friends as we grow up, and these habits shape the rest of our lives. Although some children might have a genetic predisposition to obesity, evidence shows many children as young as preschoolers have a self-regulating caloric consumption.

English: Child eating a veggie burger at a fas...

English: Child eating a veggie burger at a fast food restaurant. Français : Un enfant en train de manger un burger végétarien dans un fast-food. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Environment, parental influence, food choices, and learned behavior might well contribute to the seemingly degeneration of the body’s natural system. Early education has touched health, food, and eating from a purely scientific, void any emotional connection with food. The government has created charts for food groups and made recommendations. Although this is a positive step, many children are not offered healthy food choices or are allowed to make their own decisions. A diet of processed and unhealthy food would probably disrupt the body’s ability to regulate digestion and energy expenditure.

Kids who skip meals or overeat after long periods of going hungry create a vicious cycle of gradual and progressive weight gain.

The development of a myriad of emotional responses associated with food and eating can be derived from as many environmental influences. Food can become a desired stimulation after experiencing the effects of a sugar rush. Children will adopt their parents eating habits and emotions regarding food. Just two generations ago, fast food was not as readily available or an accepted meal. Fast food restaurants began growing like suburban weeds, after years of parents rolling through drive- thrus, and when the next generation reached driving age, the lines still got longer.

Eating can evolve into a very personal battle of control. Many American parents attempt to control their children with food. Food was often a motivational tool of reward or punishment.

Schools instituted lunch as a social event, often with rewards for eating quickly. Many schools allowed children to exit the cafeteria to go to the playground as soon as they finished eating. As many children reached their teens food became their choice for the first time. Fast food actually became a form of rebellion. The fast food industry marketed toward children and teens with characters such as Ronald McDonald, the Hamburger, and ‘Happy Meals.’ The fast food industry and Hollywood formed alliance to lure children with the latest movie action figures and toys. Fast food then infiltrated schools with sponsorships and meals. In addition, soda is now offered in many lunchrooms across the country. Soda was considered an unhealthy drink just twenty-five years ago. Soda fountains were a rare treat and self serve fountains almost unseen.

Today, the situation is different and children are bombarded with unhealthy foods. It’s time for us to teach our children healthy food habits before its too late, since childhood obesity is rising in America, and is higher than ever before.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/585182

By Nitin Chhoda

What To Do For a Special Needs Guest At a Baby Shower

Baby shower truffles.

Baby shower truffles. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A baby shower brings with it many details that need to be thought of. Along with planning the guest list, the baby shower hostess has to think about details, such as if any of the guests for the baby shower have any special needs. The baby shower will be a happy occasion, and everyone will want to feel included to be able to partake in the festivities, and share in the joy. However, when it comes to certain guests, there will be considerations.

For example, there might be guests that are physically or otherwise disabled. This fact will have a huge impact on them, and possibly others. The hostess will have to think of leeway, and space for this guest if for example they have a wheelchair. If the disabled guest has a condition where they can’t stand, or get tired easily, the hostess will need to make sure that there are chairs, or some type of seating especially for this guest. If the disabled guest needs to use the restroom frequently, the hostess needs to not only place this guest very close to the restroom, they might want to let the other guests know to be aware of their time in the restroom. Or, there might be a second restroom that the hostess could set aside just for this disabled guest.

Another consideration that the baby shower hostess needs to think of is any dietary needs or request of the guest. At the very least, there will be cake and punch at the baby shower. Most of the time, a selection of appetizers will be served. It’s common for pot luck to occur, and then the guests will bring various dishes of food. Some of the guests might not be able to eat the ingredients in the food dishes. There could be vegetarians coming, and they need to be accommodated. Worse, some of the guest might have specific food allergies. Allergies to tomatoes, nuts, eggs, and milk are very common, and can turn the baby shower into a trip to the emergency room. The hostess should be sure to ask beforehand if anyone has food allergies. The hostess should ask anyway, because there might be some guest with gluten allergies. If a cake is served, most likely it will contain wheat and or other gluten products. Another huge food allergy to be mindful of is seafood/shellfish allergies. It’s common for some form of tuna fish, or a shellfish dish to be served, such as tuna salad, or crab salads with cocktail shrimp in them. Again, the hostess should get clearance before allowing these dishes to be served.

Last, although this might be a sensitive topic, the hostess should know if there are guests who have recovery issues. It wouldn’t be out of the question for alcohol to be served at an adult only baby shower. This might make some of the guests struggle. It’s a good idea that if there are any guests in recovery, then alcohol shouldn’t be served, or added as an ingredient in the food. At the very least, the hostess should give advance warning that there will be alcohol present.

These are some considerations that will ensure that the baby shower is an inclusive, and joyful experience for everyone involved.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5179538

By Edie Mindell

Child Nutrition: Help Your Child Be Healthy

Cover of "Solid Start (Penguin Original)&...

Cover of Solid Start (Penguin Original)

The food your child eats is important not only now but also for the rest of his or her life. A small child is going to need various types of foods for energy to play, grow, and to build a healthy body. Muscles and bones are forming over the first fifteen years of life, and when eating the right types of foods and including smart nutrition your child is more likely to avoid sickness and to ward off some types of disease.

Your child’s nutrition

Your child’s nutrition is going to start with you. You child is going to see what foods you eat, and when you are more likely to eat them, and your child is going to build their own habits from those habits he or she sees you following. If you eat breakfast on the go, all the time, your child will feel this is normal and ok, but you should be sitting down to a breakfast every morning for good nutrition basics. Even if you are eating a bowl of cereal or you are enjoying a glass of juice, taking five minutes will encourage better eating habits.

Nutrition for your child’s health

Healthy beginnings start with fruits, vegetables and good portions of meats. The food pyramid is going to be important in the early stages of life so that your child will learn to eat many types of foods, and not only the foods they like the taste and looks of. Giving your child many options in life will help them pick foods that are better for them in the long run. Healthy children are not going to eat burgers and fries for every meal, but they will have a well-rounded life with nutrition builders such as fruits, vegetables, meat, and variations of these builders.

Teaching good habits for your child’s nutrition awareness will start with reading labels. Learn about what preservatives and additives are in some of the foods you are eating, and then talk about these with your child as they grow. Include foods that are all natural, or that contain very little preservatives for a solid start in their understanding of nutrition.

Be patient

Don’t try to force your children to eat if they refuse to finish their meal. By creating drama in the kitchen, you set a bad tone for the future. Kids will automatically think of mealtime as a negative experience and will only become more reluctant when it comes to eating. Be persistent by offering a variety of foods along with those you know they like. As new foods become familiar, your children will be more likely to try them.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6868076

By Dhames Wary Karthiges

Feeding Your Baby, A Parent’s Job and a Baby’s Job

Feeding a baby just starting out on solid foods is not just your job; your child has a major role in this as well. Feeding will be easier, more interesting and more nutritionally and emotionally satisfying if you follow your baby’s lead. Don’t worry about them needing to eat a certain amount of a certain food at a certain time of day. By carefully observing your child you will soon become quite good at realizing when they are hungry and when they have had enough to eat. New eaters won’t eat much at first as they are becoming accustomed to new textures and tastes. Most of their nutritional needs are still being met from breast milk or formula. Closer to 1 year of age your baby’s solid food intake will expand in quantity and variety. Then their nutritional needs can be met by the solid foods. Use the list below to keep feeding focused on your baby’s needs, not yours. Mindfully observe your child, let them do their jobs and you do yours.

Baby eating baby food (blended green beans)

Baby eating baby food (blended green beans) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Parent’s Concerns 
  1. Choose appropriately textured foods
  2. Choose 1-2 foods, if rejected- meal is over
  3. Baby strapped in high chair
  4. (Hold baby in lap for beginner eaters)
  5. Keep baby upright to avoid choking
  6. Have baby face forward, looking at you
  7. Talk calmly to baby, don’t entertain
  8. No toys, TV, games
  9. Allow baby to explore food
  10. Use spoon or let baby self feed, or both
  11. Follow baby’s lead for hunger and satiety
  12. Follow baby’s lead for tempo of eating

Baby’s Choice 

  1. How much to eat, by signaling fullness
  2. Whether they eat or not, whether they open their mouth or not
  3. Paying attention to each spoonful
  4. Touching food in dish or spoon
  5. Set tempo for feeding
  6. Self feed if they want, with which ever hand or both

How Often to Feed 

  1. Offer solids once per day until 2 tablespoons is consumed, then increase to two feedings per day
  2. When that feeding reaches 2 tablespoons, add another feeding
  3. Continue until you are feeding 4-6 times a day
  4. Formula or breast milk can be fed with or separate from solids
  5. Where to Feed
  6. At the table and in a baby safe chair
  7. In an adult’s lap
  8. Never feed in a reclining position
  9. Watch your baby carefully the next time you feed them or share a meal

The newest solid food eaters are usually willing to let a parent feed them, but many want to touch the food and/or spoon before it gets to their mouth. This being impolite behavior for an adult, we stop this action. But remember that this whole experience, sitting in a chair, having a spoon move toward your mouth, having something solid in your mouth, and having new taste is all novel.

Of course babies want to examine the food before they let it in. So let your baby check out the situation. Let them know that now they will be eating in a chair just for them. Show them the spoon, without food, let them mouth it. Then tell them that you are helping them learn to eat. Try not to push their inquisitive hands back to their laps. Put some food on their tray and let them explore. While this is happening, offer a small spoon of food by putting the food up to their mouth. If they are ready, they will open their mouth. Their table manners will conform to societal norms as their coordination develops and they start to observe others eat.

Each baby experiences foods in their own way. Some babies will grimace, some will smile, and others will look surprised or excited. However your baby reacts, don’t read meaning into it. When your baby is done chewing, offer another bite. Keep this up until they show you that they are done exploring and eating. As your baby becomes accustomed to foods, they will not need to explore as much. But they will probably still want to use their hands, and/or try to use the spoon to self feed. They want to do it themselves and are very proud of this accomplishment. So your job is to sit back, smile and let them know, “I see you can feed yourself.”

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7044863

By Beverly Pressey

Crying Baby – Reasons

Introduction:

Crying is a normal event in the lives of all babies.When a baby comes out of the woomb the first thing to do is crying.By the first cry he will take some air in to the lungs for the first time in their life.After delivery if the baby doesnot cry then it should be initiated by slightly pinching or gently strocking the feet.From this it is clear that the healthy baby should cry and it is a normal physiological event ,still some times it can upset the mother or family members.

We all know that a baby can’t tell his needs or troubles in words. The only way for him to communicate with others is by crying.Babies show some other signs like feet kicking,hand waving and head turning ect.But the best way to take the attention of others is by crying.

A toddler girl crying

A toddler girl crying (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Excessive crying may not have a firm definition because the crying habit changes from baby to baby and some babies can be calmed easily but some are difficult to sooth.If crying is distressing for the mother and home nurse it can be called excessive.Many a times baby become quiet by giving breast milk or by carrying with a gentle rocking.Sudden onset of excessive crying means baby is distressed and needs attention.The causes of crying extends from simple reasons to life threatening conditions.Hence crying of a baby should not be ignored.
Most of the time it is difficult to find the cause of the cry .Common causes are discussed here for awareness.

Common reasons for crying:

1- Hunger

A hungry baby will cry till he gets the milk. Here the old saying comes true’crying baby gets the milk’.

2- Wetting

Urination and defecation causes some discomfort and results in crying till his parts are cleaned and made dry .

3- Company

Majority of the kids need somebody near. If they feel lonely they cry.When their favourite doll slips away from the grip they cry for help.

4- Tired

When the baby is tired after a journey and unable to sleep just cry simply.They feel tired in uncomfortable sourroundings and due to unhealthy climate.

5- Heat & cold

If they feel too hot or too cold they become restless and cry. Child is comfortable in a room with good ventilation.

6- Tight cloathing

Tight cloaths especially during warm climate is intolerable for kids.Tight elastic of the the dress can also produce soreness in the hip region.

7- Dark room

When the baby wakes up from sleep he needs some dim light.If there is darkness he will disturb the sleep of parents by crying.Ofcourse he will be irritated by strong light resulting in cry.

8- Mosquito

Yes,these creatures disturb the sleep by their blood sucking and make the baby to cry.

9- Nasal blocking

Child may not be able to sleep when there is a cold and go on crying till the passage is open.

10- Phlegm in throat

This also causes difficult breathing resulting in cry.Often a typical sound can be heard with each breath.

11- General aching

Generalised body ache with restlessness is seen in flu and prodromal stages of some infectious diseases can result in continuous cry.

12- Habitual cry

Some babies cry without any real cause ending the parents in agony.Many a times doctor is called for help.

13- Nappy rash

If a tight and wet nappy is kept for a long time results in this conditon.
Rash can also be due to some allergic reaction to the elastic material of the nappy. When the rash appears it causes soreness and baby become sleepless and cry. All other skin lesions like eczema,ecthyma ,candidiasis ect also causes same problems.

14- Earache

Ear infection is common in wet climate.The infection may spread from the throat.Ear infection can result in rupture of ear drum causing discharge of pus.Eareache usually becomes worse at night when lying down.Child will become restless with cry and may not allow you to touch the ear.Some children with earache rub the affected ear frequently.

15- Colic

When the baby cry continuously most of us diagnose it as colic.This roblem is still a topic for debate because exact cause for colic is not known and diagnosis is also difficult to confirm.Colic may be associated with rumbling and distention of abdomen.Child often feels better when lying on abdomen.Some children may not allow you to touch the abdomen.If the child cries continuously doctors help is needed.

16- Infections

All infections causes some kind of pain or irritation resulting in cry.Infection may be anywhere in the body.Usually it is associated with fever, redness and swelling.

17- Reactions to certain food

It is said that one man’s food is another man’s poison. Some food articles can produce some allergic reactions.Allergy is manifested in the form of redness, breathlessness,gastric symptons and continuous cry.

18- Hard stools

Constipated babies with hard stools may cry when they get the urge for stool.Some children hesitate to pass stool because of pain .

19- Gastro esophagial reflex

Here baby cries with spilling of food after feeding.If this continues it may be due to gastroesophageal reflex.This is due to failure of the lower part of esophagus to close after food causing regurgitation from the stomach.It is difficult to diagnose this condition and can be confirmed by giving antireflex medicines.

20- Dentition

During dentition child becomes restless with crying.Often associated with gastric troubles and diarrhoea.

Some rare reasons:

1- Bowel obstruction

Bowel obstruction is associated with severe pain and vomiting.Abdomen is distended with rumbling sound.Baby is constipated with absence of flatus.

2- Septicemia

Invasion of pathogenic micro organisms in to the blood is called septicemia.Fever is associated with this condition.

3- Torsion of testes in male kids

When a male baby cries continuously his scrotum should be examined.Torsion of the testes produce severe pain which will be worse by touching the affected testes.When the testes is pressed upwards pain is releived.If this is not treated properly it can damage the affected testes due to lack of blood supply.

4- Meningitis

Initially there may not be fever,hence crying baby with alternate vacant stare and irritability should not be ignored.Fontanel is bulging. Neck rigidity and seizures may appear later.
5- Retention of urine

Children with retention of urine will have agonising pain making them restless.

6- Major injuries

Major injury to any parts of the body causes pain.Occasionally children will fall while arrying and results in head injury.Head injury is associated with reflex vomiting and convulsions.

Artificial Diet For Infants

A diet rich in soy and whey protein, found in ...

A diet rich in soy and whey protein, found in products such as soy milk and low-fat yogurt, has been shown to reduce breast cancer incidence in rats. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It should be as like the breast-milk as possible. This is obtained by a mixture of cow’s milk, water, and sugar, in the following proportions.

Fresh cow’s milk, two thirds; Boiling water, or thin barley water, one third; Loaf sugar, a sufficient quantity to sweeten.

This is the best diet that can be used for the first six months, after which some farinaceous food may be combined.

In early infancy, mothers are too much in the habit of giving thick gruel, panada, biscuit-powder, and such matters, thinking that a diet of a lighter kind will not nourish. This is a mistake; for these preparations are much too solid; they overload the stomach, and cause indigestion, flatulence, and griping. These create a necessity for purgative medicines and carminatives, which again weaken digestion, and, by unnatural irritation, perpetuate the evils which render them necessary. Thus many infants are kept in a continual round of repletion, indigestion, and purging, with the administration of cordials and narcotics, who, if their diet were in quantity and quality suited to their digestive powers, would need no aid from physic or physicians.

In preparing this diet, it is highly important to obtain pure milk, not previously skimmed, or mixed with water; and in warm weather just taken from the cow. It should not be mixed with the water or sugar until wanted, and not more made than will be taken by the child at the time, for it must be prepared fresh at every meal. It is best not to heat the milk over the fire, but let the water be in a boiling state when mixed with it, and thus given to the infant tepid or lukewarm.

As the infant advances in age, the proportion of milk may be gradually increased; this is necessary after the second month, when three parts of milk to one of water may be allowed. But there must be no change in the kind of diet if the health of the child is good, and its appearance perceptibly improving. Nothing is more absurd than the notion, that in early life children require a variety of food; only one kind of food is prepared by nature, and it is impossible to transgress this law without marked injury.

There are two ways by the spoon, and by the nursing-bottle. The first ought never to be employed at this period, inasmuch as the power of digestion in infants is very weak, and their food is designed by nature to be taken very slowly into the stomach, being procured from the breast by the act of sucking, in which act a great quantity of saliva is secreted, and being poured into the mouth, mixes with the milk, and is swallowed with it. This process of nature, then, should be emulated as far as possible; and food (for this purpose) should be imbibed by suction from a nursing-bottle: it is thus obtained slowly, and the suction employed secures the mixture of a due quantity of saliva, which has a highly important influence on digestion. Whatever kind of bottle or teat is used, however, it must never be forgotten that cleanliness is absolutely essential to the success of this plan of rearing children.

Te quantity of food to be given at each meal ust be regulated by the age of the child, and its digestive power. A little experience will soon enable a careful and observing mother to determine this point. As the child grows older the quantity of course must be increased.

The chief error in rearing the young is overfeeding; and a most serious one it is; but which may be easily avoided by the parent pursuing a systematic plan with regard to the hours of feeding, and then only yielding to the indications of appetite, and administering the food slowly, in small quantities at a time. This is the only way effectually to prevent indigestion, and bowel complaints, and the irritable condition of the nervous system, so common in infancy, and secure to the infant healthy nutrition, and consequent strength of constitution. As has been well observed, “Nature never intended the infant’s stomach to be converted into a receptacle for laxatives, carminatives, antacids, stimulants, and astringents; and when these become necessary, we may rest assured that there is something faulty in our management, however perfect it may seem to ourselves.”

The frequency of giving food must be determined, as a general rule, by allowing such an interval between each meal as will insure the digestion of the previous quantity; and this may be fixed at about every three or four hours. If this rule be departed from, and the child receives a fresh supply of food every hour or so, time will not be given for the digestion of the previous quantity, and as a consequence of this process being interrupted, the food passing on into the bowel undigested, will there ferment and become sour, will inevitably produce cholic and purging, and in no way contribute to the nourishment of the child.

The posture of the child when fed:- It is important to attend to this. It must not receive its meals lying; the head should be raised on the nurse’s arm, the most natural position, and one in which there will be no danger of the food going the wrong way, as it is called. After each meal the little one should be put into its cot, or repose on its mother’s knee, for at least half an hour. This is essential for the process of digestion, as exercise is important at other times for the promotion of health.

As soon as the child has got any teeth, and about this period one or two will make their appearance, solid farinaceous matter boiled in water, beaten through a sieve, and mixed with a small quantity of milk, may be employed. Or tops and bottoms, steeped in hot water, with the addition of fresh milk and loaf sugar to sweeten. And the child may now, for the first time, be fed with a spoon.

When one or two of the large grinding teeth have appeared, the same food may be continued, but need not be passed through a sieve. Beef tea and chicken broth may occasionally be added; and, as an introduction to the use of a more completely animal diet, a portion, now and then, of a soft boiled egg; by and by a small bread pudding, made with one egg in it, may be taken as the dinner meal.

Nothing is more common than for parents during this period to give their children animal food. This is a great error. “To feed an infant with animal food before it has teeth proper for masticating it, shows a total disregard to the plain indications of nature, in withholding such teeth till the system requires their assistance to masticate solid food. And the method of grating and pounding meat, as a substitute for chewing, may be well suited to the toothless octogenarian, whose stomach is capable of digesting it; but the stomach of a young child is not adapted to the digestion of such food, and will be disordered by it.

It cannot reasonably be maintained that a child’s mouth without teeth, and that of an adult, furnished with the teeth of carnivorous and graminivorous animals, are designed by the Creator for the same sort of food. If the mastication of solid food, whether animal or vegetable, and a due admixture of saliva, be necessary for digestion, then solid food cannot be proper, when there is no power of mastication. If it is swallowed in large masses it cannot be masticated at all, and will have but a small chance of being digested; and in an undigested state it will prove injurious to the stomach and to the other organs concerned in digestion, by forming unnatural compounds. The practice of giving solid food to a toothless child, is not less absurd, than to expect corn to be ground where there is no apparatus for grinding it. That which would be considered as an evidence of idiotism or insanity in the last instance, is defended and practised in the former. If, on the other hand, to obviate this evil, the solid matter, whether animal or vegetable, be previously broken into small masses, the infant will instantly swallow it, but it will be unmixed with saliva. Yet in every day’s observation it will be seen, that children are so fed in their most tender age; and it is not wonderful that present evils are by this means produced, and the foundation laid for future disease.”

The diet pointed out, then, is to be continued until the second year. Great care, however, is necessary in its management; for this period of infancy is ushered in by the process of teething, which is commonly connected with more or less of disorder of the system. Any error, therefore, in diet or regimen is now to be most carefully avoided. ‘Tis true that the infant, who is of a sound and healthy constitution, in whom, therefore, the powers of life are energetic, and who up to this time has been nursed upon the breast of its parent, and now commences an artificial diet for the first time, disorder is scarcely perceptible, unless from the operation of very efficient causes. Not so, however, with the child who from the first hour of its birth has been nourished upon artificial food. Teething under such circumstances is always attended with more or less of disturbance of the frame, and disease of the most dangerous character but too frequently ensues. It is at this age, too, that all infectious and eruptive fevers are most prevalent; worms often begin to form, and diarrhoea, thrush, rickets, cutaneous eruptions, etc. manifest themselves, and the foundation of strumous disease is originated or developed. A judicious management of diet will prevent some of these complaints, and mitigate the violence of others when they occur.

Article Source: http://www.articlecity.com/articles/family/article_2753.shtml

 by Jamulco Setiawan

ABC of breastfeeding

From the first moment the infant is applied to the breast, it must be nursed upon a certain plan. This is necessary to the well-doing of the child, and will contribute essentially to preserve the health of the parent, who will thus be rendered a good nurse, and her duty at the same time will become a pleasure.

This implies, however, a careful attention on the part of the mother to her own health; for that of her child is essentially dependent upon it. Healthy, nourishing, and digestible milk can be procured only from a healthy parent; and it is against common sense to expect that, if a mother impairs her health and digestion by improper diet, neglect of exercise, and impure air, she can, nevertheless, provide as wholesome and uncontaminated a fluid for her child, as if she were diligently attentive to these important points. Every instance of indisposition in the nurse is liable to affect the infant.

And this leads me to observe, that it is a common mistake to suppose that, because a woman is nursing, she ought therefore to live very fully, and to add an allowance of wine, porter, or other fermented liquor, to her usual diet. The only result of this plan is, to cause an unnatural degree of fulness in the system, which places the nurse on the brink of disease, and which of itself frequently puts a stop to the secretion of the milk, instead of increasing it. The right plan of proceeding is plain enough; only let attention be paid to the ordinary laws of health, and the mother, if she have a sound constitution, will make a better nurse than by any foolish deviation founded on ignorance and caprice.

The following case proves the correctness of this statement:

A young lady, confined with her first child, left the lying-in room at the expiration of the third week, a good nurse, and in perfect health. She had had some slight trouble with her nipples, but this was soon overcome.

The porter system was now commenced, and from a pint to a pint and a half of this beverage was taken in the four and twenty hours. This was resorted to, not because there was any deficiency in the supply of milk, for it was ample, and the infant thriving upon it; but because, having become a nurse, she was told that it was usual and necessary, and that without it her milk and strength would ere long fail.

After this plan had been followed for a few days, the mother became drowsy and disposed to sleep in the daytime; and headach, thirst, a hot skin, in fact, fever supervened; the milk diminished in quantity, and, for the first time, the stomach and bowels of the infant became disordered. The porter was ordered to be left off; remedial measures were prescribed; and all symptoms, both in parent and child, were after a while removed, and health restored.

Having been accustomed, prior to becoming a mother, to take a glass or two of wine, and occasionally a tumbler of table beer, she was advised to follow precisely her former dietetic plan, but with the addition of half a pint of barley-milk morning and night. Both parent and child continued in excellent health during the remaining period of suckling, and the latter did not taste artificial food until the ninth month, the parent’s milk being all-sufficient for its wants.

No one can doubt that the porter was in this case the source of the mischief. The patient had gone into the lying-in-room in full health, had had a good time, and came out from her chamber (comparatively) as strong as she entered it. Her constitution had not been previously worn down by repeated child-bearing and nursing, she had an ample supply of milk, and was fully capable, therefore, of performing the duties which now devolved upon her, without resorting to any unusual stimulant or support. Her previous habits were totally at variance with the plan which was adopted; her system became too full, disease was produced, and the result experienced was nothing more than what might be expected.

The plan to be followed for the first six months. Until the breast- milk is fully established, which may not be until the second or third day subsequent to delivery (almost invariably so in a first confinement), the infant must be fed upon a little thin gruel, or upon one third water and two thirds milk, sweetened with loaf sugar.

After this time it must obtain its nourishment from the breast alone, and for a week or ten days the appetite of the infant must be the mother’s guide, as to the frequency in offering the breast. The stomach at birth is feeble, and as yet unaccustomed to food; its wants, therefore, are easily satisfied, but they are frequently renewed. An interval, however, sufficient for digesting the little swallowed, is obtained before the appetite again revives, and a fresh supply is demanded.

At the expiration of a week or so it is essentially necessary, and with some children this may be done with safety from the first day of suckling, to nurse the infant at regular intervals of three or four hours, day and night. This allows sufficient time for each meal to be digested, and tends to keep the bowels of the child in order. Such regularity, moreover, will do much to obviate fretfulness, and that constant cry, which seems as if it could be allayed only by constantly putting the child to the breast. A young mother very frequently runs into a serious error in this particular, considering every expression of uneasiness as an indication of appetite, and whenever the infant cries offering it the breast, although ten minutes may not have elapsed since its last meal. This is an injurious and even dangerous practice, for, by overloading the stomach, the food remains undigested, the child’s bowels are always out of order, it soon becomes restless and feverish, and is, perhaps, eventually lost; when, by simply attending to the above rules of nursing, the infant might have become healthy and vigorous.

For the same reason, the infant that sleeps with its parent must not be allowed to have the nipple remaining in its mouth all night. If nursed as suggested, it will be found to awaken, as the hour for its meal approaches, with great regularity. In reference to night-nursing, I would suggest suckling the babe as late as ten o’clock p. m., and not putting it to the breast again until five o’clock the next morning. Many mothers have adopted this hint, with great advantage to their own health, and without the slightest detriment to that of the child. With the latter it soon becomes a habit; to induce it, however, it must be taught early.

The foregoing plan, and without variation, must be pursued to the sixth month.

After the sixth month to the time of weaning, if the parent has a large supply of good and nourishing milk, and her child is healthy and evidently flourishing upon it, no change in its diet ought to be made. If otherwise, however, (and this will but too frequently be the case, even before the sixth month) the child may be fed twice in the course of the day, and that kind of food chosen which, after a little trial, is found to agree best.

How To Start Baby Feeding Schedule

Parents are often faced with a challenge with all the decisions that are involved in taking care of their baby. As a parent, there are few points you should always remember, as you start creating a baby feeding schedule. Before your baby’s 6th month of life, it is ideal to decide ahead on what your baby should eat. According to experts, most health care providers’ recommend that you provide your baby only breast or formula milk for the first four to six months.

 Four To Six Months

To start, you should focus with your baby taking food from spoon and swallowing, as they have begun eating solid foods under the guidance of your paediatrician. You can continue breast or formula feeding plus semi-liquid iron fortified rice cereal then gradually move to other grain cereals.

Six To Eight Months

At this time, you can introduce new foods to your baby and this is the best time to check for allergies. If your child becomes allergic, you can immediately eliminate the food in his diet. This is also the best time to schedule your baby’s meal in breakfast, lunch and dinner. You can feed him same as with 4 to 6 months plus pureed or strained fruits like banana and peaches and strained or pureed vegetables such as carrots, potatoes and squash.

Eight To Twelve Months

As your baby continues to develop, you can start to add more variety of foods. A ten-month-old baby is able to eat foods from your own plate as long as you can mash them. And once your babe reaches twelve months, he can eat almost anything that is not hard for him to chew or swallow and is easily digestible. You can feed him same as with six to eight months plus soft, bite-sized biscuits, macaroni, cheese, egg, strained meats, small pieces of ripe fruits, soft-cooked vegetables and non-citrus fruit juices.

Tips To Start Solid Foods

• You can introduce solid foods sometime between four to six months if you can see your baby showing signs of being ready and can eat from a spoon.

• Make a record to figure out the best time to feed your infant solids, for example before, after, or at a divided time from formula or breastfeeding.

• In most cases, an iron fortified rice cereal is the first solid food that your baby should eat. And continue to try on other cereals, like oatmeal, and then slowly introduce strained fruits, vegetables and lastly, meat.

 • Gradually introduce the food to check for food allergies, do it by giving one food at a time, take note of the ingredient, and wait three to four days before introducing another.

• Use a teaspoon first or smaller than that when you are first introducing solid foods and the gradually shift to a tablespoon or more as your baby grows and tolerate eating solid foods.

• Consult your health care provider if your baby won’t eat any solid foods by the time he is seven to 8 months.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5402713

By Lynn Shannon M Bailey