Tag Archives: mental-health

Ways to Help Kids With Special Needs in the Classroom

Why is play so important in early childhood development? Not only does play encourage creativity and imagination but it also facilitates language development, decision making abilities, social skills, fine and gross motor development and problem solving skills that help develop the physical, social and emotional well-being of children. For a child with disabilities, pretend play is even more crucial.

Subject: Quinn, a boy with autism, and the lin...

Subject: Quinn, a boy with autism, and the line of toys he made before falling asleep See more about Quinn at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7kHSOgauhg Date: Circa 2003 Place: Walnut Creek, California Photographer: Andwhatsnext Original digital photograph (cropped and resized) Credit: Copyright (c) 2003 by Nancy J Price (aka Mom) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sensory processing can be difficult for these children and sensory toys are specially designed to help kids with disabilities learn problem-solving skills and gain a measure of control over their environment. More and more teachers and parents of children with disabilities are learning the important role sensory toys play in the life of a child with special needs and are incorporating them into their classrooms and homes.

Sensory toys are not necessarily geared towards a specific age group but rather a developmental level and skill set. A child’s age should not determine which toys are appropriate. Older children with autism, for example, can derive great benefit from toys that are designed for a younger child, such as blocks or a ball. Sensory toys for autism education are particularly important.

Many children with autism have difficulty with various textures and toys like sand and water tables, textured balls and other tactile objects can help a child overcome their difficulties with texture and touch. They can help a child with autism learn to interact with the world around them. In addition, sensory toys can help a child focus and aid in cognitive processing. Studies have shown that children who play with sensory toys during lessons retain more information then when they do not. Also, using sensory aids like a wiggle seat can help students to focus.

Some other helpful hints for the classroom:

  • Provide a fidget toy and/or wiggle seat, cushion or weighted stuffed animal during circle/seated work time.
  • Have a child do something physical in the morning or before any long period of seated time. For example, jump on a trampoline, complete an obstacle course, crash into pillows, push or pull heavy objects or do jumping jacks.
  • Position an easily distracted child away from doors, windows, fans, lights or anything that may be overly stimulating or noisy.
  • Develop consistent routines and picture schedules to help children develop good habits. Children with disabilities often crave routines as it gives them a sense of control. Make sure to try and prepare kids for any changes in routine ahead of time.
  • Once routines are established for a significant period of time, begin changing them slowly to help kids develop coping skills and build their tolerance to change.
  • Always provide positive reinforcement.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7114506

By Allen Yesilevich

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Parenting Difficult Children

Are you tired, overwhelmed or frustrated by your child’s rebellious and dishonest attitude? Do you feel as if no matter how and what you say to your children, they will still not listen to you? If the answers to these two questions are “yes”, then the time has come for you to find out that your child might have developed one of the many neurological and conduct disorders psychology has investigated in the last decade. Knowing exactly why your children behave the way they do can help you build a better parenting framework for difficult situations long-term.

ADHD or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is a neurobiological disorder usually characterized by the inability to pay attention for more than 5 minutes, impulsivity and hyperactivity. This cocktail of typically ADHD behaviour can drive some parents mad for years, making it difficult for the child to socialize or stay in school, but with a proper diagnosis and special medical treatment your child could have a normal life. It is very important to address this problem as soon as you spot the three differentiating disorder characteristics and try not to blame the child for his inability to conform to your rules. Even with medication, children with ADHD or ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) can still be difficult to deal with, however with a few tips you will manage to calm things down:

· Engage the child daily in a wide variety of games and mental challenges

· Make homework fun and try to develop their problem solving skills

· Try not to give them the right answer to a problem, but slowly walk them through the process

· Teach them that sudden outbursts of energy are not a threat or something wrong, but a source they can exploit within specific circumstances and that can be eventually controlled

Oppositional Defiant Disorder or ODD is a conduct disorder widely spread amongst children of all ages and it is normally characterized by hostility, dishonesty, extreme stubbornness, spitefulness, refusal to comply with any rules, rebelliousness and disrespect. When you child exhibits some of these symptoms it is time to approach the problem from a psychotherapeutic point of view. Once your child has the tools to cope with day-to-day life your job is to be consistent in your attitude towards him and following a few tips:

· Set out specific rules and make sure the child understands and conforms to them

· Lower your voice whenever he/she wants to argue or stirs up a conflict

· Be patient and explain to the child each time the consequences of their actions and make sure they understand the difference between good behaviour and misbehavior

· Avoid having a negative approach towards the child and calmly deal with their angry attitude

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7306122

By Abigail Simmons

ABC of breastfeeding

From the first moment the infant is applied to the breast, it must be nursed upon a certain plan. This is necessary to the well-doing of the child, and will contribute essentially to preserve the health of the parent, who will thus be rendered a good nurse, and her duty at the same time will become a pleasure.

This implies, however, a careful attention on the part of the mother to her own health; for that of her child is essentially dependent upon it. Healthy, nourishing, and digestible milk can be procured only from a healthy parent; and it is against common sense to expect that, if a mother impairs her health and digestion by improper diet, neglect of exercise, and impure air, she can, nevertheless, provide as wholesome and uncontaminated a fluid for her child, as if she were diligently attentive to these important points. Every instance of indisposition in the nurse is liable to affect the infant.

And this leads me to observe, that it is a common mistake to suppose that, because a woman is nursing, she ought therefore to live very fully, and to add an allowance of wine, porter, or other fermented liquor, to her usual diet. The only result of this plan is, to cause an unnatural degree of fulness in the system, which places the nurse on the brink of disease, and which of itself frequently puts a stop to the secretion of the milk, instead of increasing it. The right plan of proceeding is plain enough; only let attention be paid to the ordinary laws of health, and the mother, if she have a sound constitution, will make a better nurse than by any foolish deviation founded on ignorance and caprice.

The following case proves the correctness of this statement:

A young lady, confined with her first child, left the lying-in room at the expiration of the third week, a good nurse, and in perfect health. She had had some slight trouble with her nipples, but this was soon overcome.

The porter system was now commenced, and from a pint to a pint and a half of this beverage was taken in the four and twenty hours. This was resorted to, not because there was any deficiency in the supply of milk, for it was ample, and the infant thriving upon it; but because, having become a nurse, she was told that it was usual and necessary, and that without it her milk and strength would ere long fail.

After this plan had been followed for a few days, the mother became drowsy and disposed to sleep in the daytime; and headach, thirst, a hot skin, in fact, fever supervened; the milk diminished in quantity, and, for the first time, the stomach and bowels of the infant became disordered. The porter was ordered to be left off; remedial measures were prescribed; and all symptoms, both in parent and child, were after a while removed, and health restored.

Having been accustomed, prior to becoming a mother, to take a glass or two of wine, and occasionally a tumbler of table beer, she was advised to follow precisely her former dietetic plan, but with the addition of half a pint of barley-milk morning and night. Both parent and child continued in excellent health during the remaining period of suckling, and the latter did not taste artificial food until the ninth month, the parent’s milk being all-sufficient for its wants.

No one can doubt that the porter was in this case the source of the mischief. The patient had gone into the lying-in-room in full health, had had a good time, and came out from her chamber (comparatively) as strong as she entered it. Her constitution had not been previously worn down by repeated child-bearing and nursing, she had an ample supply of milk, and was fully capable, therefore, of performing the duties which now devolved upon her, without resorting to any unusual stimulant or support. Her previous habits were totally at variance with the plan which was adopted; her system became too full, disease was produced, and the result experienced was nothing more than what might be expected.

The plan to be followed for the first six months. Until the breast- milk is fully established, which may not be until the second or third day subsequent to delivery (almost invariably so in a first confinement), the infant must be fed upon a little thin gruel, or upon one third water and two thirds milk, sweetened with loaf sugar.

After this time it must obtain its nourishment from the breast alone, and for a week or ten days the appetite of the infant must be the mother’s guide, as to the frequency in offering the breast. The stomach at birth is feeble, and as yet unaccustomed to food; its wants, therefore, are easily satisfied, but they are frequently renewed. An interval, however, sufficient for digesting the little swallowed, is obtained before the appetite again revives, and a fresh supply is demanded.

At the expiration of a week or so it is essentially necessary, and with some children this may be done with safety from the first day of suckling, to nurse the infant at regular intervals of three or four hours, day and night. This allows sufficient time for each meal to be digested, and tends to keep the bowels of the child in order. Such regularity, moreover, will do much to obviate fretfulness, and that constant cry, which seems as if it could be allayed only by constantly putting the child to the breast. A young mother very frequently runs into a serious error in this particular, considering every expression of uneasiness as an indication of appetite, and whenever the infant cries offering it the breast, although ten minutes may not have elapsed since its last meal. This is an injurious and even dangerous practice, for, by overloading the stomach, the food remains undigested, the child’s bowels are always out of order, it soon becomes restless and feverish, and is, perhaps, eventually lost; when, by simply attending to the above rules of nursing, the infant might have become healthy and vigorous.

For the same reason, the infant that sleeps with its parent must not be allowed to have the nipple remaining in its mouth all night. If nursed as suggested, it will be found to awaken, as the hour for its meal approaches, with great regularity. In reference to night-nursing, I would suggest suckling the babe as late as ten o’clock p. m., and not putting it to the breast again until five o’clock the next morning. Many mothers have adopted this hint, with great advantage to their own health, and without the slightest detriment to that of the child. With the latter it soon becomes a habit; to induce it, however, it must be taught early.

The foregoing plan, and without variation, must be pursued to the sixth month.

After the sixth month to the time of weaning, if the parent has a large supply of good and nourishing milk, and her child is healthy and evidently flourishing upon it, no change in its diet ought to be made. If otherwise, however, (and this will but too frequently be the case, even before the sixth month) the child may be fed twice in the course of the day, and that kind of food chosen which, after a little trial, is found to agree best.

Top 10 Ways To Prevent Obesity In Kids

I’m sure you’ve seen the dire reports about childhood obesity becoming rampant in America. It’s a scary thing and not an experience any of us wish upon our children. Preventing obesity can be easy and empowering for children. Give them control over their bodies. Teach them to tune in to their real needs and to treat themselves with love and respect.

1) Allow children to be in charge of which foods they eat.                                                               Obesity kids

2) Make all foods equal and teach kids to check in with their bodies and choose foods based on what their bodies are asking for.

3) Encourage them to know when they are full and to stop eating at that point.

4) Let them eat according to their own hunger patterns rather than according to external schedules.

5) De-emphasize body shape and weight. Encourage kids to love and accept their bodies unconditionally.

6) Help them find fun ways to move and play so they get plenty of enjoyable exercise every day.

7) Love them unconditionally and don’t make derogatory comments about their looks or weight.

8) Be sure they never get started on the damaging cycle of dieting and bingeing.

9) Let food just be fuel for the body. Don’t turn it into a reward or save certain things to be special treats.

10) Teach them to honor other people and not tease or make fun of others who are fat.

Adults who want to lose weight through intuitive eating are encouraged to eat like a two year-old child. The most effective thing we can do to prevent childhood obesity is help children stay in touch with their bodies and honor its needs.